Working remotely

Working on an island in the Caribbean isn't as easy as you might believe, and in many ways it's more difficult than working in a traditional work environment.   No one thinks you have work to do: If you're a backpacker, chances are you're not a stranger to communal living spaces. This means loud conversation, shared wifi and worst of all, people who can't take a hint. Peace and quite is less than occasional and calls to clients are usually made from semi-quiet bathrooms at 4am when no one is awake to bogart the wifi. To other backpackers, you'll be branded as antisocial. Some will ask what you do, and after explaining that you work online, will continue talking to you as if they ignored your answer. In Caye Caulker, there are droves of socially inept people who can and probably have made others go mad with their disregard for nonverbal cues. Shared wifi connections: We all know shared wifi is common when traveling, but did you know it's also really unsafe? If you access your bank account or other sensitive websites using shared wifi, a simple "man in the middle" program can be used to watch everything you're doing.  Keeping electronics charged and clean: If you're traveling in third world countries, Caye Caulker included, forget strategically placed outlets and comfortable seating. If you can even find an outlet, your charging cord won't reach from where you're sitting. Even if you were smart enough to bring an extension cord, the outlet either won't work or your cord won't hold itself in the outlet. Dust and humidity on the island are infamous for keeping your expensive electronics from lasting as long as they should. Being disciplined: Going to work in a boring office is hard enough, but what if your office had a bar, pool, and a never ending supply of fit girls in bikinis? Distractions are everywhere and it takes constant will power to shut out the play when it's time to work.  ‚Äč

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